Sunday, April 28, 2013

Good, Better, Best! Recognizing our Enemy called Average


Wise men know that the enemy of the good is the better, and the competition of the better is the best!

What does this mean? Oftentimes, we miss and don’t try to look for the better because we are hypnotized and made complacent by having the good. Or, we don’t aim for the best possible outcome because we already improved from good to better. In common lingo, we often hear: “Puede na ang puede na…” 

The game of poker also uses the same logic of good, better, best as the basis for winning;  the game is interesting and challenging since the best  poker players are able to bluff their way to win by making it appear that what they have is the best even if it is not true.

John Mason's book, “The Enemy Called Average”  challenges us vs. the  satisfaction and complacency of being content with just coasting along and being  one amidst the crowd.

For Hyper2 class, here are several examples of Good, Better, Best

1. Submission of Assignments

Bad: You did not email your assignment. Or you emailed a hastily done work but it was late.
Good: You emailed your assignment on time to vcoach.serves@gmail.com
Better: You read all the instructions and guidelines to make the assignment the best that it can be and you emailed it on time.
Best: You accomplished the better, but you multiplied the impact by posting it on twitter, embedded it in your blog, posted it as a comment (and not as a separate post) on Hyper2 online or the assigned on-line bulletin board.
    


 2. Session Summaries
Bad:  Reporting group did not follow the summary template. Or they posted 4 days after the class session.
Good: Used the template. Posted within  48 hours (or Sunday) after the class session.
Better: Posted the best links to the lectures.  Direct to slideshare links of the lecture are ok but the best links are the ones from the hypermaps since they direct the user to blogposts or blog entries which have additional details. 

For example:
Good link: 2. 21 Secrets of Effective Presentations: 
http://www.slideshare.net/josephdeungria/21-steps-for-effective-communications-v53

Good link:  Remember This! Mastering Concepts through Stories, Images, Diagrams and Links: 
http://www.slideshare.net/josephdeungria/remember-this-2013-pdf

Remember our traffic light? Red, Yellow, Green and Blue? That is exactly: Bad, Good, Better and Best! What color is the brand called you?

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